SayWhatClub

Live, Love, Learn and Leave, if You Need!

Ah, beloved – it’s been eight weeks, since I wrote my first article about certain effects of mask-wearing on communication with the hard of hearing; time to log some more ideas and experiences.

All praise and glory to God for healing and protection during this time as ever; prayers for the world (leaders and regular folks), and realization of our need to turn back to God. May we be humble and repentant in these days.

Shout out to essential workers (this includes everyone, even those not “working”), former CDC colleagues (whom I’m not ripping every time I post something related to its’ institutional failures), my new and old buds at EPA, and beloved with hearing loss and other disabilities. I’m thankful for you all.

Thankful I could contribute to my country’s work in the professional realm too. A CDC friend reached out to me in April, because s/he knew CDC’s renowned hearing loss communications expert (me!) had only recently left to seek better working conditions. S/he knew who to call, so I gave my “free” expertise to inform CDC’s phone contact tracing, considering people with hearing loss, Deaf, and late deafened, and various communication possibilities (paid for by my trials, but glad to finally be effective for my tribe!).

We have to LIVE during this pandemic, so I’ve gone about my business, practicing the safety and health principles I know and seeking to learn and share knowledge. I’ve traveled safely and with purpose and sought to keep my own health paramount. That old adage: “put on your mask first, before putting one on another” is something to take to heart in every situation, not just when flying or in a pandemic.

Also, living among multitudes of masked others, I’ve had to pray daily for more grace, patience, and love – both to give and receive. Say and DO Shema! Love the Lord Your God… and neighbor as self, Ange!

So thankful for these people, because they helped me learn – and teach them, for those who’d listen long enough for a nugget of communication improvement we might use in the future or with another:

–        For a postal worker’s kind rescue from a fearful coworker’s refusal to write down instructions, as well as rescue from the scene created by the fearful coworker’s “able-ist” reactions to my need. All I wanted to do was get my mail off, not gain ADA/Rehab Act lawsuit fodder that day. Also, I’m thankful for the “fearful” postal worker creating the opportunity to know she needs prayer!

–        For the young lady at REI who re-rung my order to attach to my membership number, graciously receiving my gentle feedback that next time, she should ensure the hard of hearing customer understands her questions (such as, for my member number, which she asked once, but I missed, and that would not have given me credit for the purchase under my membership).

–        For many who realize they can safely stand 6 or 10 feet away (outside or when other barriers are present) and pull down their mask for a moment to let me lipread them. (That’s the range of a hearing aid – 6 to 10 feet – but we who wear them, and the kind people who “get it” know that a hearing aid has so much more power when a user’s eyes are focused on faces and lips.)

–        For another young lady named Katie (mom’s name!) at a business, who learned a bit about hard of hearing mask-readers after I called her Kayla and she’d assured me that I could hear her… Getting her name wrong was the clincher! I helped her realize how disrespectful she was by challenging me, and asked her to do better by giving the next customer the benefit of doubt.

–        For a security guard who reminded me to respond faster to “attitudes” behind masks, especially when mask-owner is armed. (I stayed outside a farmer’s market at closing, drinking my $1-decaf as I’d done another day, but this guard had a different attitude than the other… with his soft voice, I tried to hear him (as I thought he was asking about my welfare), until he yelled, “Leave!”

–        For a Sport Clips hair stylist who cut my hair after 5 months (a pandemic-in-its-own-right), using Ava (ava.me), my trusty speech-to-text app, so we could communicate behind our masks. Here’s me and my new “do” thanks to her. (Note: I asked for a socially-distanced photo; she declined.) Nonetheless, I was happy I could actually stand looking in the mirror at myself to take this selfie!

So there you have it; lessons, love, and learning, and a bit of leaving, when necessary. Love each other peeps, regardless of our ideologies, shades of skin, cultures, abilities and/or any absences thereof. We will embrace and shake and hold each other’s hands when this thing is over or when each individual is ready. In the meantime, fight institutional and social injustice. Use your voice to speak out against it. Just don’t do violence.

Angie (Fugo) Fuoco

for Blog Post
Sometimes, it is just too hard to understand what is being said around us. Be kind to yourself; those who love you will understand.
The views and opinions expressed by the author does not necessarily represent the views of the SayWhatclub administrators and/or subscribers, and are provided solely for informational and educational purposes.  The SayWhatclub is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information provided.”
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